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Technology News

Transmission of specific colors of light over long distances
Posted on Tuesday July 17, 2018

Researchers have reached a new milestone on the way to optical computing, or the use of light instead of electricity for computing. They explored a new way to select and send light of a specific color using long silicon wires that are several hundred nanometers in diameter and their work enabled a new type of nanoscale ''light switch'' that can turn on and off the transmission of one color of light over very long distances.

A dozen new moons of Jupiter discovered, including one 'oddball'
Posted on Tuesday July 17, 2018

Twelve new moons orbiting Jupiter have been found -- 11 'normal' outer moons, and one that they're calling an 'oddball.' Astronomers first spotted the moons in the spring of 2017 while they were looking for very distant solar system objects as part of the hunt for a possible massive planet far beyond Pluto.

Astronomers find a famous exoplanet's doppelganger
Posted on Tuesday July 17, 2018

A new planet has been imaged, and it appears nearly identical to one of the best studied gas-giant planets. But this doppelganger differs in one very important way: Its origin. One object has long been known: the 13-Jupiter-mass planet beta Pictoris b, one of the first planets discovered by direct imaging, back in 2009. The new object, dubbed 2MASS 0249 c, has the same mass, brightness, and spectrum as beta Pictoris b.

Homogeneous BTK occupancy assay
Posted on Tuesday July 17, 2018

A time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based BTK occupancy assay measures target engagement in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and in lymph-node and bone-marrow samples.

Decade of research shows little improvement in websites' password guidance
Posted on Tuesday July 17, 2018

Leading brands including Amazon and Wikipedia are failing to support users with advice on how to securely protect their data, a study shows.

How does the sun's rotational cycle influence lightning activity on earth?
Posted on Tuesday July 17, 2018

A collaborative research team has taken the first steps to understanding how the sun's rotational cycle influences lightning activity. They found answers in an unusual source -- diaries dating back to the 1700s.

Researchers make and test atom-thick boron's unique domains
Posted on Monday July 16, 2018

Defects are often observed when making borophene, the single-atom form of boron, but unlike in other two-dimensional materials, these mismatched lattices can assemble into ordered structures that preserve the material's metallic nature and electronic properties.

Why pulsed sparks make for better ignition
Posted on Monday July 16, 2018

Researchers have learned the mechanisms behind a means of improved ignition, helping to open the door to better performance in all types of combustion systems.

Electronic stickers to streamline large-scale 'Internet of things'
Posted on Monday July 16, 2018

Researchers have developed a new fabrication method that makes tiny, thin-film electronic circuits peelable from a surface. The technique not only eliminates several manufacturing steps and the associated costs, but also allows any object to sense its environment or be controlled through the application of a high-tech sticker.

Single-celled architects inspire new nanotechnology
Posted on Monday July 16, 2018

Scientists have designed a range of nanostructures resembling marine diatoms -- tiny unicellular creatures. To achieve this, they borrow techniques used by naturally-occurring diatoms to deposit layers of silica -- the primary constituent in glass -- in order to grow their intricate shells. Using a technique known as DNA origami, the group designed nanoscale platforms of various shapes to which particles of silica, drawn by electrical charge, could stick.

Magnetized wire could be used to detect cancer in people
Posted on Monday July 16, 2018

A magnetic wire used to snag scarce and hard-to-capture tumor cells could prove to be a swift and effective tactic for early cancer detection, according to a new study.

Study of high-energy neutrinos again proves Einstein right
Posted on Monday July 16, 2018

A new study demonstrates that Einstein is right again. The most thorough test yet finds no Lorentz violation in high-energy neutrinos.

What's causing the voltage fade in Lithium-rich NMC cathode materials?
Posted on Monday July 16, 2018

Researchers explain what's causing the performance-reducing 'voltage fade' that currently plagues a promising class of cathode materials called Lithium-rich NMC (nickel magnesium cobalt) layered oxides.

Forget joysticks, use your torso to pilot drones
Posted on Monday July 16, 2018

Your torso is more intuitive -- and more precise -- than joysticks for piloting drones, both simulated and real, according to a recent study. Work is already underway to implement this new body-machine-interface technology for search and rescue with drones.

Buried Internet infrastructure at risk as sea levels rise
Posted on Monday July 16, 2018

Thousands of miles of buried fiber optic cable in densely populated coastal regions of the United States may soon be inundated by rising seas, according to a new study.

Electric car batteries souped-up with fluorinated electrolytes for longer-range driving
Posted on Monday July 16, 2018

Researchers have figured out how to increase a rechargeable battery's capacity by using aggressive electrodes and then stabilizing these potentially dangerous electrode materials with a highly-fluorinated electrolyte.

Microscopic trampoline may help create networks of quantum computers
Posted on Monday July 16, 2018

Researchers have developed a microscopic ''trampoline'' that can absorb microwave energy and bounce it into laser light -- a crucial step for sending quantum signals over long distances.

Faster photons could enable total data security
Posted on Monday July 16, 2018

Researchers have solved a key puzzle in quantum physics that could help to make data transfer totally secure.

AI-based framework creates realistic textures in the virtual world
Posted on Monday July 16, 2018

Many designers for the virtual world find it challenging to design efficiently believable complex textures or patterns on a large scale. Indeed, so-called 'texture synthesis,' the design of accurate textures such as water ripples in a river, concrete walls, or patterns of leaves, remains a difficult task for artists. A plethora of non-stationary textures in the 'real world' could be re-created in gaming or virtual worlds, but the existing techniques are tedious and time-consuming.

What happens when we heat the atomic lattice of a magnet all of a sudden?
Posted on Monday July 16, 2018

Magnets have fascinated humans for several thousand years and enabled the age of digital data storage. They occur in various flavors. Ferrimagnets form the largest class of magnets and consist of two types of atoms. Similar to a compass needle, each atom exhibits a little magnetic moment, also called spin, which arises from the rotation of the atom's electrons about their own axes. In a ferrimagnet, the magnetic moments point in opposite directions for the two types of atoms (see panel A). Thus, the total magnetization is the sum of all magnetic moments of type 1 (M1), blue arrows) and type 2 (M2), green arrows). Due to the opposite direction, the magnitude of the total magnetization is M1-M2.

 



 

 

 

 


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