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Technology News

Using bacteria to create a water filter that kills bacteria
Posted on Friday January 18, 2019

Engineers have created a bacteria-filtering membrane using graphene oxide and bacterial nanocellulose. It's highly efficient, long-lasting and environmentally friendly -- and could provide clean water for those in need.

Enhanced NMR reveals chemical structures in a fraction of the time
Posted on Friday January 18, 2019

Researchers have developed a way to dramatically enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), a technique used to study the structure and composition of many kinds of molecules, including proteins linked to Alzheimer's and other diseases.

Smart microrobots that can adapt to their surroundings
Posted on Friday January 18, 2019

Scientists have developed tiny elastic robots that can change shape depending on their surroundings. Modeled after bacteria and fully biocompatible, these robots optimize their movements so as to get to hard-to-reach areas of the human body. They stand to revolutionize targeted drug delivery.

Classic double-slit experiment in a new light
Posted on Friday January 18, 2019

An international research group has developed a new X-ray spectroscopy method based on the classical double-slit experiment to gain new insights into the physical properties of solids.

Waves in Saturn's rings give precise measurement of planet's rotation rate
Posted on Friday January 18, 2019

Saturn's distinctive rings were observed in unprecedented detail by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, and scientists have now used those observations to probe the interior of the giant planet and obtain the first precise determination of its rotation rate. The length of a day on Saturn, according to their calculations, is 10 hours 33 minutes and 38 seconds.

New ways to harness wasted methane
Posted on Friday January 18, 2019

The primary component of natural gas, methane, is itself a potent greenhouse gas. A recent study has unveiled a high performance catalyst for methane conversion to formaldehyde.

Saturn hasn't always had rings
Posted on Thursday January 17, 2019

In its last days, the Cassini spacecraft looped between Saturn and its rings so that Earth-based radio telescopes could track the gravitational tug of each. Scientists have now used these measurements to determine the mass of the rings and estimate its age, which is young: 10-100 million years. This supports the hypothesis that the rings are rubble from a comet or Kuiper Belt object captured late in Saturn's history.

New thermoelectric material delivers record performance
Posted on Thursday January 17, 2019

Taking advantage of recent advances in using theoretical calculations to predict the properties of new materials, researchers have discovered a new class of half-Heusler thermoelectric compounds, including one with a record high figure of merit -- a metric used to determine how efficiently a thermoelectric material can convert heat to electricity.

Stress fracture? Your foot hitting pavement wasn't the main problem
Posted on Thursday January 17, 2019

It starts as a persistent and irritating pain in the foot or lower leg, then it gets more intense, maybe with swelling, and soon a runner knows she's being sidelined by one of the most common running injuries: a stress fracture. These tiny cracks in the bone can halt training for months or even end a sports season. A segment of the multibillion-dollar wearables industry aims to save potential victims from this fate, but an engineering professor found a major problem: the devices are measuring the wrong thing.

Scientists find increase in asteroid impacts on ancient Earth by studying the Moon
Posted on Thursday January 17, 2019

A team of scientists has determined the number of asteroid impacts on the Moon and Earth increased by two to three times starting around 290 million years ago. Previous theories held that there were fewer craters on both objects dating back to before that time because they had disappeared due to erosion. The new findings claim that there were simply fewer asteroid impacts during that earlier period.

Reinforcement learning expedites 'tuning' of robotic prosthetics
Posted on Thursday January 17, 2019

Researchers have developed an intelligent system for 'tuning' powered prosthetic knees, allowing patients to walk comfortably with the prosthetic device in minutes, rather than the hours necessary if the device is tuned by a trained clinical practitioner. The system is the first to rely solely on reinforcement learning to tune the robotic prosthesis.

How molecules teeter in a laser field
Posted on Thursday January 17, 2019

When molecules interact with the oscillating field of a laser, an instantaneous, time-dependent dipole is induced. This very general effect underlies diverse physical phenomena. Now scientists report on an experiment where the dependence of the driven-dipole response on the bound state of an electron in a methyl iodine molecule is revealed.

Blister fluid could help diagnose burn severity
Posted on Thursday January 17, 2019

Severe burns can leave physical and psychological scars, especially in children. When a burn patient enters the clinic, doctors use factors such as the depth and size of the burn, as well as the time required for skin healing -- or re-epithelialization -- to determine the best course of treatment. Now, researchers have found another, possibly more accurate way to classify burn severity: analyzing proteins in blister fluid.

Complex molecules emerge without evolution or design
Posted on Thursday January 17, 2019

In biology, folded proteins are responsible for most advanced functions. These complex proteins are the result of evolution or design by scientists. Now scientists have discovered a new class of complex folding molecules that emerge spontaneously from simple building blocks.

Additive manufacturing reflects fundamental metallurgical principles to create materials
Posted on Thursday January 17, 2019

Engineers have been taking a novel approach to the development of engineering components produced using additive manufacturing.

Cultivating 4D tissues: The self-curving cornea
Posted on Thursday January 17, 2019

Scientists have developed a biological system which lets cells form a desired shape by molding their surrounding material -- in the first instance creating a self-curving cornea. The astonishing video shows the cornea molding itself into a bowl-like structure over the course of 5 days.

New test to detect disease and infection
Posted on Thursday January 17, 2019

Researchers have developed a highly innovative new enzyme biomarker test that has the potential to indicate diseases and bacterial contamination saving time, money and possibly lives.

This computer program makes pharma patents airtight
Posted on Thursday January 17, 2019

Routes to making life-saving medications and other pharmaceutical compounds are among the most carefully protected trade secrets in global industry. Building on recent work programming computers to identify synthetic pathways leading to pharmaceutically complex molecules, researchers have unveiled computerized methods to suggest only synthetic strategies that bypass patent-protected aspects of essential drugs.

Puzzling phenomenon in a quantum gas: Insulators with conducting edges
Posted on Thursday January 17, 2019

Insulators that are conducting at their edges hold promise for interesting technological applications. However, until now their characteristics have not been fully understood. Physicists have now modeled what are known as topological insulators with the help of ultracold quantum gases. They now demonstrate how the edge states could be experimentally detected.

Proposed engineering method could help make buildings and bridges safer
Posted on Thursday January 17, 2019

Researchers discovered that the distance between dislocations in nanolayer interfaces of pearlite can determine how much the material can stretch or contract without breaking (ductility). The dislocations are disruptions in the regular arrangements of atoms in nanolayers. This discovery opens the possibility of engineering materials with higher ductility by simply manipulating the spacing between their dislocations and may improve the safety of structures such as buildings and bridges in earthquakes.

 

 


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